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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic o
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
the foreign policy and the united states by a descanting the state of israel. to be totally honest with you, i am very disappointed. liz: one of neil's favorite and frequent guest and said he was grateful for every day of his life. >> diane 85 years old whenever by calls me i am ready. >> i never heard somebody talking much about dying. >> ion 85. honestly i am a very good health. i am enjoying my life. i have no complaints. >> that was a bombshell. >> but americanamerican s are afraid lou: good evening, everybody. the dow jones industrials tonight above 14,000 for the first time since october of 2007. it just 155 points from its all-time high. the s&p regaining the 1500 level, the labor department today reporting 157,000 jobs were created last month, almost 170,000 people, however, dropped out of the workforce, despite all of that. the national unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage. it now stands at 7.9. eight and a half million people have dropped out of the work force since president obama took office. the developments overseas tonight. a suicide bomber attack. the u.s. embassy i
office in 2009. for more now on this attack, the president's foreign policy, i'm joined by pulitzer prize-winning journalist of fox news contributor, judith miller, fox news middle eastern terrorism analyst. let me begin with you. this attack on -- this sneak attack during the secretary's tenure is kind of an art of vice, but the reality is that we still have enemies who are pursuing their interests, even as we deny the force, the power, and the, if you will, the ubiquity of those forces. >> absolutely. i mean, the denial of the kind of need to continue the war and terror in this administration is really striking. hillary clinton wonders out, says farewell to her troops, takes a swipe at her critics and the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee has to point out, by the way, this calls for a sweeping review of the security of our diplomatic facilities, and she is never asked about it, does not have to respond to it. she is really amazingly adept at dodging hard questions. lou: adept, immune, inoculated, teflon, if you will. this secretary of state, despite the miles logged, almos
a favorable opinion of her. it's an open question whether her tenure includes a standout foreign policy achievement. still unresolved issues include iran's nuclear program, the lack of a middle east peace process, and the raging war in syria. clinton made her final appearance on capitol hill nearly two weeks ago to testify about september's attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. it claimed the lives of the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. she took aim at senate republicans who accused the obama administration of deceiving the nation about what happened. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest? or was it because guys out for a walk one night who decided they would go kill some americans? what difference, at this point, does it make? >> suarez: president obama, gave her high praise in a joint interview sunday with cbs's "60 minutes." >> i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. ( cheers and applause ) >> suarez: clinton said her immediate go
on the jihadization for a policy under obama? i said, ma'am, with all due respect, president obama's foreign policy is an extension of president bush's foreign policy. if there's any difference at all, president obama is killing more people overseas than president bush ever did. so, no, i don't think there's any difference between the bush foreign policy and the obama foreign policy, which i think is a shame. there was a wonderful opportunity to take a different path and to reclaim our position as a moral leader in the world. i am disappointed in that. with regard to john brennan, i've known him since 1990. i worked directly for john brennan twice. i think he is a terrible choice to lead the cia. i think it is time for the cia to move beyond the ugliness of the post-september 11 regime, and we need someone who is going to respect the constitution and not be bogged down by a legacy of torture. i think president obama's upon of john brennan sends the message to all americans. >> you worked with him, directly for him. did he receive internal updates regularly about the torture techniques including wat
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
think this speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since the vietnam. if it is carried out, i will resist it." the question continued on for months and months talking about what a disaster the surge would be even when it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said "the term quagmires could apply. some reject that term, but if that is not a quagmire, what is? even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview with the "financial times" -- you said i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president obama. do you stand by those comments? >> senator, i stand by them because i made them. >> were you right? where you write in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history to assert -- to sort that out. >> the committee deserves to know whether you are right or wrong about the search. >> i will explain why -- >> i want to know if you are right or wrong. it's a direct question. >> the surge assisted in the objective. >> will you please answer the questi
? were you correct or incorrect when you said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the -- >> are you going answer the question, senator hagel? were you right or wrong? >> the nominee said the quote referred to his feelings about the iraq war in general, not just the surge. he took heat for his work with global zero, group which says it's committed to eliminating all nuclear weapons globally. hagel was asked if he's anti-american nukes. >> the position of global zero, my position, some of the individuals national security leaders talked about including himself, has never been unilateral disarmament. never. ever. >> hagel backtracked on the comment about the political power of the "jewish lobby." >> i should have used another term. i'm sorry. i regret it. >> the use of intimidation, i should have used influence. i think it would have been more appropriate. >> coming in the hearing, hagel were controversial nominee. a number of senators on both sides said it was uncomfortable bei
he is going to give his manifesto on what republican foreign policy should be. that's going to be next week on ronald reagan's birthday, rand paul. but, you know, it's fitting, because we're coming up on reagan's birthday. and did you hear about the horrible obama muslim marxist thing about his kenyan home? did you hear? >> this is one wall that probably shouldn't be torn down. this apartment building used to be the home of a young ronald reagan. it was denied landmark status, and the university of chicago is ready to demolish it. the university is also trying to become the site of president obama's presidential library. that's drawing strong concerns the university might turn president reagan's former house into a parking lot for an obama library. >> did you hear about that? chicago close ties with the obamas, all of them, tearing down ronald reagan's boyhood home in order to make a parking lot for barack obama's presidential library. did you hear? did you hear? see, here it is on drudge. reagan's home could become parking lot for obama library. here it is on something call
on foreign policy can do it through hagel today, through this hearing. the past positions hagel has taken where supporters of israel believe that he has made statements that suggest he's soft on israel, he does not support the president's positions on iran, or that he does not view hezbollah as a terrorist organization, administration officials say he will clearly address all those past statements, put them to bed and make it emphatic that he fully supports the president's positions today and yet they know this will be a drawn out in their view political exercise and think he could get confirmed by well more than the 60% majority because he's a member of the senate club and in the end they support somebody who they view as a senator and in the white house's view still a mainstream person. jake? >> we're listening right now as we're watching right now as senator levin of michigan introduces the new members of the senate armed services committee, senator levin, democrat of michigan we see there, next is senator chuck hagel, was former republican senator from virginia john warner, chuck hage
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think to in really don't need today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is what they
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
a nominee tries to disavow his past positions on virtually every foreign policy issues all at the same time it raises serious questions. >> if hagel is confirmed by a strict party vote, how will it affect his relationship with republicans in congress? >> it sticks that he went from being a loyal republican to somebody who frankly took a differently point of view. he didn't endorse president obama, but he traveled with him and now prepared to be his secretary of defense. they kind of recent the fact that they think he is going to the other side. that said when he is in the pentagon and controls the military in that capacity, they will have to deal with him and have the same interest in common. both parties want to keep the u.s. strong and safe and chuck hagel has been through worse. believe me, he has seen much more incoming than at that hearing. >> republican strategist, good to see you. thank you. >> good to see you. >> still ahead on the saturday afternoon, the latest on the scandal around the top u.s. senator. first, on this date, an announcement that led to the moment so many had been c
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
to be devoted to? but -- what is this 15 minutes going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propos
too difficult, and they become foreign policy presidents in part because they have so much more leeway. but for barack obama, i think this happened early. >> tay, we got the obama plan for leaving iraq... >> president obama announced the current phase of the war is coming to an end... >> narrator: early on, obama had set a timetable for withdrawing troops from iraq. >> within 19 months... >> he came into office promising to get out of iraq. his rise had a lot to do with his opposition to the iraq war. and i don't think he ever looked back. >> narrator: but there was another, secret side to obama's approach to the world. candidate obama had been critical of much of the bush administration's top secret war on terror. as president, it was a different story. >> his people made it clear that in the terrorism arena, he was going to be as tough if not tougher than the bush people. he was going to be extraordinarily aggressive. he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a n
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
our state department, and to work with me in tackling this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> reporter: what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you for the possibility of secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters. and i'm pretty sure her reply was something along the lines of, not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton secretary of state designate. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed. but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> so was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been s
. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, our, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. [laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism,
that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? where you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to -- >> answer the question wellesz senator hagel. the question is storywriter wrong? that is a pretty straightforward question. >> the nominee said that referred to his feelings about the war in general and not just the surgeon took heat about his work with 00. hagel was as defeat is anti-american nukes. >> the position of 00, my position that certain individuals, nestle security leaders have talked about including himself, it has never been unilateral disarmament, ever. never. >> hagel backtracked on his comment about the political power of the jewish lobby. >> i should have used another term, and i'm sorry. i regretted. the use of intimidation, i should have used influence. i think that would have been a more appropriate term. >> coming into the hearing hagel was a controversy among many, so some fireworks were expected, but the number of senators on both sides said it was uncomfortable being in there as fox business labored to expl
the question. were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam, were you correct or incorrect? >> my reference to -- >> the question is were you right or wrong. that is a pretty straightforward question. i would like you to answer whether you were right or wrong and free to elaborate? >> i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> let the record show he refuses to answer that question. >> sean: and pretty unbelievable patrick j. buchanan and bill richardson. gentlemen, good to see you both. >> how are you doing? >> sean: pat, i was going back in time and few moments i was watching a cable news opinion show by the name of crossfire. does that bring back memories for you? >> i had to testify before the watergate committee. it brought that back to me. i think chuck is a patriot and he has an independent mind. i disagreed with him on the surge. i supported it. i said the iraq war and invasion and occupation and killing thousands and thousands of people to deprive it of weapons it did not even have, we
on american foreign policy and done enormous good for all of us and for the country we serve. we will miss you deeply. but none of us -- but none of us will ever forget your extraordinary leadership and each of us will always be deeply proud to say that we served in hillary clinton's state department. and so, now it's my great honor to introduce one last time, the 67th secretary of state of the united states of america, hillary rodham clinton. >> oh. thank you. thank you. oh. well, just standing here looking out at all of you, the people i have been honored to serve and lead and work with over the last four years is an incredible experience. when i came in to this building as the secretary of state four years ago, and received such a warm welcome, i knew there was something really special about this place. and that having the honor to lead the state department and usaid would be unique and singular, exciting and challenging. it has been all of those things and so much more. i cannot fully express how grateful i am to those with whom i have spent many hours here in washington, around the world
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)